Inzlingen Watercastle, near Lörrach, southern Germany

We stumbled upon this watercastle more or less by accident. We drove from Lörrach on a Sunday afternoon towards the river rhine and saw a sign at the road “Watercastle right”. Since we didn’t have a specific plan for the day, we decided to take a look what this watercastle is all about. Glad we did.

The castle, which looks more like a large house built in the style of the 16 hundreds, was first mentioned in 1511 a.d. as property of a doctor Peter Wölfflin. It is however believed, that the castle was actually built around 1400 a.d. based on various documents mentioning a castle in that area.

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The moat was most likely added in the 16th century but wasn’t intended for military purpose. It was most likely a trend that came from the netherlands at the time.

The building was used for several purposes over the decades, for living, industrial production and storage. The castle today is the town hall, a restaurant and a hotel. So visiting means just looking from the outside unless you’re hungry or have something to do in the town hall. Either way, it’s located in a small town (Inzlingen) with lots a woods and open area to roam around. Very relaxing short trip when you have a coupole of yours time or when passing through the area. There’re a few more watercastles in the area on the swiss side of the river rhine: Castle Bottmingen, Castle Entenstein, Castle Friedlingen.

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Hope you enjoyed.

Bernd

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